Randall D Alexander, MD – Orthopaedic Arm Care Specialist
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Elbow

Normal Anatomy :: Elbow Arthroscopy :: Lateral Epicondylitis
Biceps Tendon Repair :: Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Normal Anatomy of the Elbow

How does the Elbow joint work?
Find out more in this web based movie


Elbow Arthroscopy

The elbow is the joint that connects the upper arm bone and the forearm bones. Elbow joint helps in movement of the arms forward, backward, as well as to twist the arms inside and outside.

For more information about Elbow Arthroscopy click on below tabs.

  Elbow Arthroscopy  

Lateral Epicondylitis

Lateral epicondylitis, commonly referred to as tennis elbow, is an overuse injury that causes inflammation of the tendons that attach to the bony prominence on the outside of the elbow.

For more information about Lateral Epicondylitis click on below tabs.

  Lateral Epicondylitis Lateral Epicondylitis

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital tunnel release surgery is the surgery to correct the cubital tunnel syndrome. Cubital tunnel syndrome, also called ulnar nerve entrapment is a condition caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in an area of the elbow called the cubital tunnel. The ulnar nerve travels down the back of the elbow behind the bony bump called the medial epicondyle and through a passageway called the cubital tunnel.

Fracture Treatment, Hand Injuries Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Biceps Tendon Repair

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Biceps tear can be complete or partial. Partial biceps tendon tears will not completely break the tendon. Complete tendon tears will break the tendon into two parts.

Find out more about Bicep Ruptures from the following links.

Biceps Tendon Repair Biceps Tendon Repair

Interactive web based movies (click on the desired topic to find out more)

Elbow Fracture Elbow Fracture Golfer's Elbow Golfer's Elbow
Elbow Sprain Elbow Sprain    

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Arthritis of the Elbow

Osteoarthritis of the elbow occurs when the cartilage surface of the elbow is damaged or becomes worn. This can happen because of a previous injury such as elbow dislocation or fracture. It may also be the result of degeneration of the joint cartilage from age. Osteoarthritis usually affects the weight-bearing joints, such as the hip and knee. The elbow is one of the least affected joints because of its well matched joint surfaces and strong stabilizing ligaments. As a result, the elbow joint can tolerate large forces across it without becoming unstable.

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Biceps tendon tears at the elbow

The biceps muscle is in the front of your upper arm. It helps you bend your elbow and rotate your forearm. It also helps keep your shoulder stable.

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Distal Humerus Fractures

The three bones that come together to form the elbow can break (fracture) in different ways. A distal humerus fracture is one type of elbow fracture. The distal humerus is the end of the upper arm bone (the humerus) that forms the upper part of the elbow.

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Elbow Dislocations and Fracture-Dislocations

When the joint surfaces of an elbow are separated, the elbow is dislocated. Elbow dislocations can be complete or partial. In a complete dislocation, the joint surfaces are completely separated. In a partial dislocation, the joint surfaces are only partly separated. A partial dislocation is also called a subluxation.

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A Patient's Experience with Elbow Fracture and Bone Graft

When Roxanne Jamison retired after 22 years as a civilian employee of the U.S. Defense Department, she had no trouble finding things to do. An enthusiastic church volunteer, the 73-year-old retiree taught pre-school, answered phones, visited nursing homes, greeted worshipers at church services, attended Bible study and learned to play the organ. In her spare time, she took up country line dancing and traveling. Roxanne was on a vacation cruise when she fell and severely fractured her elbow.

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Broken arm

A broken arm is a common injury. About one in every 20 fractures involve the upper arm bone (humerus). Children are more likely to break the lower arm bones (radius and ulna).

Falling on an outstretched hand or being in a car crash or some other type of accident is usually the cause of a broken arm.

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Dislocated Elbow

When the joint surfaces of an elbow are separated, the elbow is dislocated. Elbow dislocations can be complete or partial. In a complete dislocation, the joint surfaces are completely separated. In a partial dislocation, the joint surfaces are only partly separated. A partial dislocation is also called a subluxation.

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Elbow Bursitis

Bursae are thin, slippery sacs located throughout the body that act as cushions between bones and soft tissues. They contain a small amount of lubricating fluid that allows the skin to move freely over the underlying bone.

The olecranon bursa lies between the loose skin and the pointy bone at the back of the elbow called the olecranon.

Normally, the olecranon bursa is flat. If it becomes irritated or inflamed, more fluid will accumulate in the bursa and bursitis will develop.

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Elbow Fractures in Children

Whether your child is an active athlete or just a toddler jumping on the bed, there's a good possibility that he or she will take a spill at home or on the playing field at some time.

These falls are usually harmless. But, when a child falls on an outstretched arm, the velocity of the fall combined with the pressure of hitting the ground could be enough to fracture, or break, a bone around the elbow. That's how most fractures around the elbow joint occur.

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Erb's Palsy (Brachial Plexus Injury)

Erb's palsy is a form of brachial plexus palsy. It is named for one of the doctors who first described this condition, Wilhelm Erb.

The brachial plexus (BRAY-key-el PLEK-sis) is a network of nerves near the neck that give rise to all the nerves of the arm. These nerves provide movement and feeling to the arm, hand, and fingers. Palsy means weakness, and brachial plexus birth palsy causes arm weakness and loss of motion.

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Forearm Fractures in Children

The bones of the forearm are the radius and the ulna. If you hold your arm naturally by your side, the ulna is the bone closer to you and the radius is farther away.

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Olecranon (Elbow) Fractures

When you bend your elbow, you can easily feel its "tip," a bony prominence that extends from one of the lower arm bones (the ulna). That tip is called the olecranon (oh-lek'-rah-nun). It is positioned directly under the skin of the elbow, without much protection from muscles or other soft tissues. It can easily break if you experience a direct blow to the elbow or fall on a bent elbow.

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Radial Head Fractures

Trying to break a fall by putting your hand out in front of you seems almost instinctive. But the force of the fall could travel up the lower forearm bones and dislocate the elbow. It also could break the smaller bone (radius) in the forearm. A break can occur near the elbow at the radial "head."

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Throwing injuries in the elbow

With the start of the baseball season each spring, doctors frequently see an increase in elbow problems in young baseball players. A common elbow problem in these children is medial apophysitis, commonly referred to by doctors as "Little Leaguer's elbow."

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Ulnar nerve entrapment

Ulnar nerve entrapment occurs when the ulnar nerve in the arm becomes compressed or irritated. The ulnar nerve is one of the three main nerves in your arm. It travels from your neck down into your hand, and can be constricted in several places along the way. Depending upon where it occurs, this pressure on the nerve can cause numbness or pain in your elbow, hand, wrist, or fingers.

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